Potentiometers for guitar.

Discussion for DIY amp builders.

Potentiometers for guitar.

Postby Corey » Sun Mar 04, 2007 3:37 pm

Hey all,

I have a guitar that has a piezo crystal pickup system. I didn't like the way its controls were so I gutted the electronics and am in need of infomation to wire a piezo pickup system. Namely, can you use a tone control with a crystal pickup and what do I need for a volume pot.

One other question, why don't guitar pots use the lugs found on stereo pots. I have saw wires soldered to the back of the pot. Why do they do this?

Corey :D
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby Corey » Sun Mar 04, 2007 3:39 pm

I forgot to ask if I need a little capacitor as well and if I do, what value.

The cable coming from my piezo pickup has a single tiny wire insulated, then covered with a braid, tha's it.

Corey :D
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby Corey » Sun Mar 04, 2007 4:02 pm

Okay I just was reading on the Parker guitar site and none of the models have tone controls for the piezo pickups. So looks like I need a single mono volume pot:

I remember seeing a little capacitor here and there when I gutted everything, what are they used for?

What value pot do I need? 500k?

Are the pots log or linear?

Would PEC make something suitable for guitar?

I can't wait to hear my guitar with new wire and a good quality volume pot and no switches. :mrgreen:
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby Eddie Vaughn » Sun Mar 04, 2007 6:03 pm

Howdy Corey,

I dunno how to wire a piezo transducer pickup, but a regular humbucker uses a 500K audio taper volume pot and tone control with a .022uF cap for the tone control. Single coils use 250K audio taper pots and a .047uF tone control cap.

Try Mundorf Silver Supreme in Oils for tone caps (if you retain the tone control). You wouldn't believe the difference between a good PIO and the chintzy ceramic caps that come in guitars when you roll the tone to 10 and play that mellow jazz type of tone on the neck and middle pickups. Instead of a dead, flat, muddy tone, you get a warm, smooth, clear, rich tone.

But if you're not going to use the tone control, a guitar most certainly sounds better without it wired up. Having one is a compromise.

I'd bet the PEC pots would sound fantastic for guitar use! They're far larger than the pots in most guitars, so make sure they'll physically fit in your electronics cavity first. Also, their bushing diameter is larger than most pots used in today's guitars, so you may have to enlarge the hole in the guitar top a bit.

The shaft of a PEC pot is 304 stainless steel, and nearly impossible to saw with a hacksaw. If the shaft is too long, you'll have to use a bench grinder to shorten it. 304SS is an abrasion resistant metal and gets hot VERY quickly, so you have to grind a second or two and then dunk the end in water. I have to shorten each and every one for amplifier use, and there's really no better way to do it than the bench grinder.

Finally, most guitars today have pots with 6mm shafts, which is .014" smaller than the PEC's ¼" diameter shaft. You'll have to get some new ¼" knobs.

The reason electric guitars use the back of pots for a ground point is because of the number of grounds that usually must be ran. It also makes sure the case of the pot acts as a shield for its own internals. You can use the lug alone as your tie point for grounds, but still it's good to bend it back until it just touches the case and then solder them together.

On some pots made in the past few years, you must first use some steel wool, sandpaper, or a fine wire brush on the spot you want to solder, to remove the exceptionally solder-proof plating layer on the case. :x

Eddie :D
Last edited by Eddie Vaughn on Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Eddie Vaughn
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:05 pm

Postby Corey » Sun Mar 04, 2007 8:13 pm

Your the man Eddie, thanks for taking my abuse bro. and still being there. :lol:

Okay so I understand this, if I am doing a simple volume knob then I require a simple log taper 500K pot and if I am doing a tone control I use an additional 500k pot with a .047uF cap in series on the + terminal, correct?

This is assuming the piezo pickup will work with those values. I will call the Parker tech support and find out exactly what values I need. Okay a few more quick questions:

- If I can do a tone control does the tone control come before the volume pot in the chain, then out to the amp?

- Is there a tone control I can make that will cut the high end? I am going to start using the Gold Optima strings and they a bright because they don't tarnish. I mainly want the tone control cut cut the top end. Would this mean an inductor instead of a cap?

Corey :D
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby Eddie Vaughn » Mon Mar 05, 2007 3:12 am

OK, you're wanting a bit less bright sound? No problem, read on:

The whole reason you use a 500K pot with 'buckers and 250K with single coils is the same reason you use a different reflected impedance ratio output transformer on different guitar amps. Very simply, in both cases, you do it because it affects the tone in a desirable manner.

A 500K pot places half the load on the pickup that a 250K pot does, which allows less high frequencies to be bled off to ground. Since humbuckers don't generally have an overabundance of highs anyway (especially very hot ones), the 500K pot preserves the high frequency response. But, when you place your single coil Strat bridge pickup on a 500K pot, the sound is glassy and brittle. A 250K pot bleeds more highs off to ground, and gives a warmer, more balanced tone. If the "normal" pot value for the pickup you're wanting to wire up is 500K, simply using a 250K pot instead will give a warmer tone.

To make a single coil even warmer and mellower sounding, use a 150K pot. Do note, that you also lose a little bit of punch and output as well, and make the overall tone more relaxed which may or may not be desirable depending on your application and personal tastes.

The tone control must always come after the volume control in the chain. It always uses a capacitor, not an inductor. A tone control is nothing more than a variable, passive low pass filter. Although it kinda sounds as if the bass is boosted, they are strictly passive and don't boost anything at all, they only passively roll off the highs.

When you turn up the tone pot, you bring in more of the filter. The larger the cap value, the lower the cutoff point of the filter. This is why single coils generally have a .047uF cap, to kill more highs and therefore be as effective as the smaller .022uF value is with the less bright humbuckers.

These are generalities however. Some of your early Fenders had a .1uF cap, which REALLY rolled off the highs with just a tiny tweak to the tone pot. On the flip side of the coin, some single coil guitars have .022uF tone caps, especially where you have a HSS configuration and the .047uF value rolls off too much highs too quickly on the bridge humbucker or bridge-middle combination.

You know, something just hit me while I was typing here! You're talking about using your bridge piezo pickup. If it's active (has a battery and onboard preamp), which I'm sure it is, it probably uses something like a 10K or 25K pot. Lowering the pot value won't affect your highs, since it has an extremely low output impedance.

Again, you can just tweak it with the tone control, though. I'd probably use a .015 to .022uF value PIO cap. I mentioned Mundorfs earlier, but Jensens also sound mahvelous. I might also be willing to part with one of my very old British military .022uF paper in oils that I bought from a surplus dealer many years ago, that are still in the original hermetically sealed packaging. They sound fantastic as tone caps.

BTW, are you going to use the Gold Optimas because they last longer, or for another reason? If solely for the long life, you should try Elixir NanoWeb strings. They have a plastic film coating to seal them, and are a little less bright to begin with than normal strings but they keep that same tone for a very, very long time before they ever begin deteriorating.

Eddie :D
User avatar
Eddie Vaughn
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:05 pm

Postby Corey » Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:58 pm

Eddie,

Wow, thanks for your help. I talked to a guitar tech. and he helped me out as well, but you made it simpler for me. :D

My pickup system is actually a true passive piezo transducer. The early Nitefly's used a passive Fishman piezo. The whole philosophy of this I believe was for the price of the guitar. The Nitefly was basically designed to hit a pricepoint so players could get the playablity and tone of the Fly without the cost. The answer was a 22 fret, bolt-on neck, passive piezo Nitefly. The problem was the passive system used a rather inconvenient stereo cable and apparently players wanted better switching. So in 1998 the active Fishman was introduced.

Personally, I prefer my passive system because there is no batteries to change and corners were not cut on its body construction to pay for the electronics. The newest "improved" models with the active Fishman system had much thinner bodies and went from maple to ash. I played one of the newer version's and did not like its feel at all. It was too light and had no resonance in the neck, basically just another ho-hum/dime a dozen, dead guitar. I like my backgrounds "velvety black" thank-you-very-much... :D

http://www.parkerguitars.com/media/pdfs ... istory.pdf

Much like the Fender legacy, it appears the corporate bean counters are compromising a good thing and the Parker's today are no different. They are now owned by Washburn which is a division of U.S. Music Corp. and made overseas. I dunno, there is something about the quality and craftmanship of gear when a company is just starting out that is simply, superior. In 97 when mine was built, I can picture the small group of folks at Parker really wanting to make a statement and earn a share of the pie in the $1500 bolt-on market, a very important market.

The tech. mentioned that I can use anywhere from a 250K, 500K or even a 1 meg volume pot with the passive piezo. He also said I can use a tone control and use either the cap values you mentioned. He mentioned Switchcraft for good brands.

I am really leaning towards a tone control because I have a little Crate acoustic amp that is very bright sounding.

Corey :)
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby Corey » Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:46 pm

Forgot to mention why I am using the strings. They are supposed to last forever. I have used the Elixir strings but the wrap comes off the round strings and the plains tarnish still.

Did some looking into the gold strings and looks like they are being manufactured again. Maxima used to make them in Germany and they sold for something like $90 a set but now with the whole focus on no tarnish and longer string life by players, Optima is now making them. 24 karat gold plated and affordable, check Ebay. Brian May apparently fully endorses them now and his signature set is my favorite and what the graphite nut on my axe accepts, 9-42.

Corey :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yc8xyL0 ... ed&search=
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby Corey » Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:46 pm

Okay I found one. I figure I will go 500K and preserve the output since I will probably go with a tone control circuit of probably .047uF cap.

So is this a good one or THE one for me. Need I be concerned about 2 watt, 1 watt rating etc.?

http://www.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch ... 93&Site=US

One other question, do I need 2 of these? I am thinking I must need a different value for a tone control because wouldn't 2 of these simply turn the volume up and down?

Corey
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby Eddie Vaughn » Tue Mar 06, 2007 2:45 am

Hi Corey,

I'd forgotten all about Maxima strings! I had a bandmate back in the '80s who used them on his Ovation acoustic, and I can't honestly remember seeing any since then. They were just too expensive. Do you remember SIT (Stay In Tune) strings from the '80s? Steve Lukather was their big celebrity endorser. I tried some once, but never used them again. Oddly enough, contrary to their name and sales line, they wouldn't stay in tune AT ALL. How about Kahler strings? Remember those? Hey, how about Kahler TREMOLOS? All are now relics of the past.

Nothing ever has or ever will beat a Floyd Rose, even though I do have a certain affinity for my Kahler Pro that I use with a Floyd Rose locking nut. The obsolete Washburn Wonderbar and Kahler Flyer, as well as Wilkinson and most of the "licensed by Floyd Rose" bridges are awful. Steinberger Trans-Trems stayed in perfect tune but were way too finicky.

The double locking Kahler/Floyd Rose hybrid was pretty good, except for the G would often go out of tune a bit (sharp) and you were always grabbing for the fine tuner. Before you locked down the nut, you had to make sure you had the "G" fine tuner screwed nearly all the way in so you'd have enough counter-clockwise travel for plenty of tuning tweaks.

There were only a few of the Kahler/Floyd hybrids made before Kahler went belly up. I had one on a Peavey Vandenberg, which Peavey still makes as the V-Type. I absolutely adored the guitar's feel and sound, but eventually sold it because of the tuning problems. OTOH, I could go total wacko on a Floyd for a whole gig and it would still be in tune when I cleaned the strings and put it in the case.

You mentioned the plastic film coming off the wound Elixir strings after time. Yep, they most certainly do that. It slowly frays and leaves little "fuzzies" hanging off. It's too bad that stainless steel strings sound so brittle, thin, and bright. Bummer. I don't think they're even made any more. I guess it seemed like a good idea to their designer at the time!

I hate to hear that Parker has resorted to costcutting like most other guitar manufacturers. A solid, thick block of maple definitely costs a lot more than a thin ash body, but to me ash just doesn't sound good despite all the hype surrounding it. It's too fuzzy and unfocused sounding. Koa, alder, and mahogany all have great tone, but maple is hands-down the best sustaining and most sharply focused body wood, especially when paired with a good ebony fingerboard. It's very different from the alder or poplar body/rosewood fingerboard sound. I have an old Carvin that's an Eastern Hard Rock maple body and neck, and it just sustains forever, with incredible chime and clarity. Unfortunately, it's also so heavy it makes a Les Paul Custom feel like a piece of styrofoam.

I wasn't aware that Washburn owns Parker now, but the drop in quality you described is pretty typical of what happens when the big mass production company buys the Mom and Pop boutique company. It sounds like the same thing that happened when Hondo bought Charvel, or (as you mentioned) when CBS bought Fender. Everything went to pot overnight. It's sad that the whole reason we now have much better cheapo line guitars than we did 20 years ago is the same reason we now have poorer upper middle line guitars now than we did 20 years ago, which is machine-manufacturing of guitars.

Hartley Peavey revolutionized the way electric guitars were made by replacing hand labor with CNC machining. Today, you can get a guitar for $500 (or less) that feels and plays as good as a guitar costing $800 to $1000 back in the mid '80s. But, it's also made everything into a single, "generic cookie cutter" category that feels and plays the same; not quite bad, but not quite good either.

Today, the only differences between a $400 guitar and a $1300 guitar are a little better woods, better attention to detail in fret dress and setup, and sometimes maybe also name brand pickups. The very best guitars still cost upward of $2K to well over $2.5K, the same as they did back in the '80s, and have lots of highly skilled hand labor involved after the initial CNC work, the same as they did back in the '80s.

Nothing will ever beat the excellence of Old World craftsmanship by a master artisan who "feels" his craft. Humans make art, machines just make "stuff." It's like when drum consumer market machines first came out, and they were predicting that as the technology improved the machines would replace real human drummers on a large scale. I always said it would never happen no matter how good drum machines got, and over two decades later it still hasn't. Truth is, it can't. No machine can ever replace a real drummer until it learns how to throw drumsticks at the back of your head, eat the hamburger you were saving for after the gig, and make a pass at your girlfriend. :wink:

Eddie :D
User avatar
Eddie Vaughn
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:05 pm

Postby Eddie Vaughn » Tue Mar 06, 2007 3:17 am

Oops, in my rambling I forgot to complete my answer! You don't have to worry about the wattage rating for the pot. In an electric guitar, even a 1 meg pot is probably only dissipating something like one-millionth of a watt of heat!

You'll use the same value for the tone control as for the pot. Remember, the tone control is nothing more than a low pass filter, which is a "selective" volume attenuator targeted solely at the high frequencies. It sits "outboard" of the main volume control and doesn't affect ANYTHING but the highs, leaving the midband and bass frequencies unaltered.

The link you posted to the Digi-Key catalog page is expired, so I'll e-mail you a .pdf of it with the proper one noted. I have that page saved in my "component library" I use for designing amps.

Eddie :D
User avatar
Eddie Vaughn
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:05 pm

Postby Corey » Tue Mar 06, 2007 5:42 pm

The headstock on the Vandenburg was something else. I don't know if Peavey made other guitars with it but I remember seeing pictures in old rags of Adrian with a white one and the curve of the inverted headstock looked exceptional.

As far as trem's go, I prefer the Original Floyd Rose. I would usually just tune the strings a touch flat before I locked up the nut and that brought things pretty close when it was tightened up. On one cheap Vantage guitar I had with it, the low E would always go flat on me and eventually I ran out of thread on the fine tune peg but other than that, the Original's were basically flawless in performance. My Parker actually is sans trem. I bought it that way, the previous guy who sold it to me had broken it off. He was a virtuoso and would practice for 16 hours a day sometimes. I figure he must have got a little wild one night because he never gigged and the polyurethane finish never had a single nick in it so I don't thing he "lost" it on his guitar. Ever done that? :D Whoops, time to buy a new guitar. LOL

I never tried the SIT strings, just remember the ads of them, the hand bending them. My string experience wasn't really that extensive. I pretty much stuck to Boomers or D'Addario XL's. Went through a Hammett phase of Blue Steel's and Ball's lasted a long time for me but for the garbage I used to play, I liked Boomers. I remember reading an interview with George and he said that GHS makes strings for many other companies so he played GHS mainly because he figured they knew what they were doing. :)

I am very anxious to hear what my guitar is going to sound like after I get it going. Hi-fidelity inspired me to look into making the guitar sound much better. Can't believe I waited this long but I just recently learned the basics of terminating a simple cable. I was always confused before when I saw a shield in a cable and a ground. Plus, my guitar had a stereo output of 2 wires and a stereo 1/4 output jack so that added to the confusion. The trem. springs would always resonate with this nasty sound so I damped those. Since my trem. is locked I used foam but Blue Tac would probably work on a functional trem.

I also took all the pickups apart and knocked all the magnetic poles from the single coils(they are just waxed in) and removed the magnet bar from the inside back of the Dimarzio humbucker. So the magnetic pickups are inactive and I am going to try things direct from the piezo.

I want to see what the sound is going to be like with zero string pull from the mag. pickups and maximum resonance on the piezo.

I am expecting the sound is going to be pretty impressive for acoustic timbre through my Crate and the attack should be unreal through my break-up amp. I am expecting some pretty strong treble presence though, hence the tone circuit. Basically tweaked the amp as fast as I could! LOL :) I remember reading your post on the results of that experiment with an amp one time and I hope guitar will give different results! I can't afford to buy stock in Tylenol.

The humbucker still looks normal but the single coils had these holes where the poles were so I salvaged some thin silver sheet metal out of an old scanner and made false poles under the covers. It is really weird to look at because there are no poles sticking out from the cover but from a straight-on view the silver shines through the holes and it looks normal.

I am thinking that the exceptional quality of the PEC carbon pots and a Jensen cap will make the sound very good even though the tone circuit is a compromise. I think the way this guitar will sound, a tone control might be a required element and perhaps a 0.1 uF cap might be a good idea if I go with 500K pots.

Just using your intuition here, should I go 250K with a 0.047uF cap or should I go 500K with 0.1 uF?

I would try both but those pots and caps are so darn expensive. I want to get this on one try.

So what's with all this? Well my DEC 685 cd player died on me a few days ago so instead of listening to music I figured it was time to start making music again. I also recently viewed a cd rom of Eddie Van Halen and his new Frankenstein replica guitar. The video interviewed him promoting that ugly thing and he said alot about his philosophy on his sound. To quote him, "I couldn't find or afford the sound I wanted so I had to make it!"

I was really inspired by that interview and for the first time was in awe at the history of that guitar. The guy took a single coil body and just carved out a humbucker hole. I knew that before but to see close-ups, well it is a complete butcher job! :D Not really my style but I liked the fact that it is all trial and error really.

It was funny to learn that some people's lives revolved around that guitar. He should have never painted it red though, I prefered the black and white one. The pickup in that thing measures 0 conductivity. The pick up alone would sell for lots of money. Still I would never pay $30,000 for the replica.

BTW, Eddie Van Halen was either drunk, high or is completely burnt out because that interview is downright sad. Another one who needs Jesus in his life or he is going to end up where Dimebag is. :cry:

Corey
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Postby rayd » Tue Mar 06, 2007 5:56 pm

Looks like their '07 reunion is postponed...

Image
Select (EV modded), Parker 95's, CAL Alpha-DAC/Delta-Transport, Promitheus Audio TVC Reference 1, Blue Jeans Cables, NOS Tubes, HAL-Os
User avatar
rayd
Member
Member
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 5:08 am
Location: Massachusetts

Postby Eddie Vaughn » Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:57 pm

I've tried lots of strings, including all the usual suspects such as Dean Markley, Ernie Ball, GHS, D'Addario, Fender, and Gibson, and less mainstream stuff like DR, Kahler, SIT, and Darco. I've always preferred Boomers over everything else. Well actually, GHS made Kahler strings, and as you mentioned several "house brands" for manufacturers like Carvin. I always used to buy Carvin-labeled Boomers because way back when you could get 10 sets from Carvin for $28, and they were always factory fresh and new instead of being tarnished and dull from age because they'd sat on the shelf in the music store for 5 years.

"I figure he must have got a little wild one night because he never gigged and the polyurethane finish never had a single nick in it so I don't thing he "lost" it on his guitar. Ever done that? Whoops, time to buy a new guitar. LOL"

I myself haven't ever done it, but 20 years later it still chafes me sometimes when I think about a guy I know who did. The story: I had the import version of the Kramer Beretta, made in Japan by ESP. It had an original Floyd Rose, which was all there was back then (no "licensed under Floyd Rose patents" stuff), and played like a dream.

A friend of mine had this cheap old Strat copy that would always go out of tune when he played live, and I sold him my Kramer for almost nothing because he couldn't afford a really good new guitar and I felt sorry for him. I even let him pay it out in payments, and then I eliminated the last payment as a Christmas present to him.

Well, at a big gig a few months later he broke a string towards the end of the last song, and you know what happens when you break a string on a Floyd! He was a wild showman anyway, and when his guitar went out of tune he freaked out and did a Pete Townshend, smashing the Kramer into a million pieces all over the stage. I know, I know, it was no longer my guitar, it was his. I should have just gotten over it, or rather shouldn't have even given it a second thought in the first place. Oh well... :?

You mentioned damping the tremolo springs. one of my favorite tweaks! It makes an enormous improvement. Tremolo spring resonances sound AWFUL. I myself use electrician's putty to dampen the springs, BTW. Another nice tweak is to dampen Strat pickups and pickguards by stuffing cotton under and around the pickups in the body top cavities.

Removing the pole pieces from the humbuckers will most definitely change the sound through the piezo. It's amazing just how much effect the pickups' magnetic pull has on the strings. I have a guitar with active EMGs in it (almost zero magnetic pull), and the sustain just goes on and on. On the flip side of that, a big part of why Strats sound so cool is the high magnetic pull of the 3 single coil pickups. It does do a number on the sustain, though.

I think you'd be fine with 500K pots and a .022uF cap. You won't need a bigger value cap, just roll the tone control on more if you need to. The large cap values will really push the low frequency cutoff point down low, to the point where you may lose some of your upper mids.

Eddie :)
User avatar
Eddie Vaughn
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 889
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 12:05 pm

Postby Corey » Thu Mar 08, 2007 8:12 pm

Well, I was just about to order some 500K pots then decided I had better check into it more. The tech. I talked to didn't have authoritive answers and something was burning in me to check into the matter further, glad I did.

I called Parker and was emailed the actual company pdf. wiring schematics for the exact model I have. Here is the interesting part, the volume control on the piezo is extremely high impedance. It requires a 5 meg, yes, a 5000K potentiometer. The capacitor on it is .033 uF.

So I guess wiring up a Fishman passive piezo requires 5 megs. PEC only makes up to 1 meg. so that is out. I guess I will have to search for a good quality 5 meg pot. Not very common.

I wonder what putting the 1 meg PEC on it would sound like. I was at my electronics shop and they had a pile of PEC's there. The 1 meg. was linear taper though. I should have spent 9 bucks and just tried it.

If you know of any good quality 5 meg pots. let me know.

I loved the Kramer Berreta. Wasn't that the humbucker only, red only, and with another cool inverted headstock? That was another thing Eddie talked about on that interview was tilting the humbucker to line up the strings. I actually just saw that exact guitar in a pawn shop where I just bought my new source. An original Sony Playstation. :mrgreen: Hoping I can do something with the $30 I spent. Need to open it up and see if I can change the jacks and look into using it as a transport. I remember someone saying it made a good player or transport.

Corey :D
:)
Corey
Respected Member
Respected Member
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2006 8:45 pm
Location: Saskatchewan

Next

Return to Amp Builders

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests